The Q7 sits on an adapted version of the platform that underpins both the Volkswagen Touareg and Porsche Cayenne.

Its immensely high bonnet line provides the demeanour of a battleship and while we’re swift to praise most Audis for having a certain elegance of line, we’ll be politely declining to comment in such terms about the Q7. It has undeniable presence and that’s about the nicest thing we can say about it.

Matt Saunders Autocar

Matt Saunders

Road test editor
Driving position is excellent but it's hard to judge where the extremities of car are.

Sensibly Audi has long since seen the light regarding the combination of petrol engines and a 2.3 tonne kerbweight and none is offered for sale, at least in the UK. Instead there is a choice of two versions of the same 3-litre V6 diesel, one offering 201bhp the other 241bhp. Actually while the step up in power is easily noticed, it’s the additional 73lb of torque of the stronger engine that you’ll both notice and appreciate more.

Of course if you want your Q7 to provide performance commensurate with its stately surrounds, there’s also a 334bhp, 4.2-litre V8 diesel closely related to that in the flagship A8 limousine and if you thought the 405lb ft of torque of the more powerful 3-litre engine sounded impressive, be advised the V8 comes to market with 589lb ft. This should be enough to do anything this side of reversing the rotation of the earth.

Find an Autocar car review

Explore the Audi range

Driven this week

What the Q7 lacks is a smaller capacity four cylinder diesel that even with a 2-litre displacement could easily match the power and torque of the entry level V6 but provide better performance and handling through reduced weight not to mention wildly improved fuel consumption. Nor is there any hybrid powerplant available, at least as yet.

Save money on your car insurance

Compare quotesCompare insurance quotes

Find an Autocar car review

Explore the Audi range

Driven this week