There’s no denying that, from either perspective, it’s still a rewarding car to drive – because of its sheer pace, high degree of mechanical grip, immense traction and glorious noise. Consequently it's justifiably worthy of bearing the RS badge.

It’s also satisfying to know that - although you might not be as thrilled through the corners as much as you would in its rivals - that you can deploy all of the available power without any undue concerns. For those looking to use their cars to the fullest of their extents throughout the year, this is a critical point.

While Audi might argue that price is a non-issue when you’re looking at spending this much, it still bears some consideration. Tick several options, as Audi suggests most will, and the price for the RS7 easily spirals well over the £100,000 mark, equivalent to that of the similarly capable all-wheel-drive Panamera Turbo.

Audi’s fast four-seater may be a phenomenal performer and better equipped as standard, but there’s no doubting that the Porsche would be the more cohesive and rewarding option; it also feels the more premium product. If you're into the six-figure range it also may be worth considering the likes of a nearly new Bentley Continental GT.

Keep close to the standard specification, though, and the Audi RS7 Sportback offers serious all-weather ground-covering capabilities with a modicum of practicality for a comparatively inexpensive price.

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