With the determinedly upmarket DS brand above it, Citroën is overtly targeting a more budget-conscious customer.

Consequently, while you can’t have a DS 3 for much less than £15,000, the entry-level five-door C3, with a normally aspirated version of the Puretech engine, is less than £12k.

Nic Cackett

Nic Cackett

Road tester
CAP expects the C3 to fare better than the Polo or Clio if you buy now — which is no mean feat for Citroën

However, as that Touch model does away with alloys and includes manual air-con, it will be about as popular as the Zika virus in the UK.

Realistically, the range starts at mid-level Feel, where you get the choice of every engine, plus a 7.0in touchscreen and 16in alloys as standard. However, you’ll need to fork out extra for the Airbumps.

The costliest Flair model tested comes with the lot but cannot be bought with the lower-powered diesel engine.

The difference between it and the more powerful BlueHDi 100 in terms of running costs is piffling, though, the latter offering sub-100g/km CO2 emissions too and 76.3mpg combined. But it starts north of £17k – more than you’d pay for a five-door Mini One D.

The Puretech 110 Flair is slightly more affordable at just under £16k, but even that is sufficient to include the five-door Mini Cooper and outgoing Ford Fiesta 1.0T Titanium as direct rivals. Which is anotherway of saying that a potential buyer’s fondness for the C3’s Airbumps needs to be pretty significant.

Top 5 Superminis

Find an Autocar car review

If you remain keen on a C3 then we recommend biting the bullet and opting for the Flair model with the mid-range petrol engine.

Save money on your car insurance

Compare quotesCompare insurance quotes

Find an Autocar car review