The Mondeo was one of the first big Fords to usher in the firm’s first installment of its ‘Kinetic’ design language. First previewed on the Iosis concept of 2005 and making production on the Mondeo-based S-Max seven-seat MPV of 2006, Kinetic was all about sharp tensioning lines to give the impression of movement even when the car is sitting in the car park.

The concept was essentially just a thinly veiled look at the new Mondeo, and sure enough, one year later, the Mondeo arrived at the 2006 Paris motor show sporting a bold new look that eschewed the understated, yet elegant styling of its immediate predecessor.

Nic Cackett

Nic Cackett

Road tester
There is very little between the exterior dimension of the Mondeo and the old Scorpio luxobarge

At the front, the Mondeo features Ford’s recognisable trapezoidal grille and headlight design. The new car is much wider than its predesscor around five inches, in fact, which results in a bulky looking front end. But the drag coefficient is the same: 0.31.

Heading towards the rear of the car, the C-pillars might help give the Mondeo a more slippery shape, but they are a real pain when it comes to rear visibility. This problem is only compounded by the high tail line. 

The Mondeo does have a few tricks up its sleeve, however. Ford hasn’t forgotten the significant importance of the fleet market to the Mondeo’s success: the lower half of the tailgate is a body-coloured plastic ‘sacrificial panel’, for improved dent resistance and cheaper repairs if it gets damaged.

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Another notable introduction from the Mondeo’s launch in 2007 was the EasyFuel capless tank orifice — a one-time Autocar award-winning feature — that prevents misfuelling of petrol or diesel by only allowing entry of correct fuel nozzle.

The Mondeo underwent a facelift at the 2010 Moscow motor show, which brought with it a more technical look for the front end. It included new front and rear bumpers, a new headlight design and a new front grille, complete with lashings of chrome trim. 

There’s no longer a four-door saloon in the Mondeo range. Instead there’s a saloon-lookalike five-door hatchback as well as a cavernous five-door estate.

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