This is where the Infiniti really sets itself apart from the competition. The EX can be a genuinely fast and entertaining car to thread through a sweeping bend, and much of this is due to the electronically controlled four-wheel drive system, which is a modified version of the one used in the Nissan GT-R.

On a normal dry surface the EX is, in effect, rear-wheel drive until the moment the computer senses a loss of traction, at which point up to 50 percent of the torque can be sent to the front wheels. A standard mechanical limited-slip diff also adds to the high level of traction.

Nic Cackett

Nic Cackett

Road tester
Sporting chassis makes for stout control and real dynamic poise on a dry circuit

The speed-sensitive steering is well weighted and always offers the right level of response and resistance. It’s a joy to use, both in focused driving and in normal everyday use.

Body control is excellent, and while there is some roll on entry to corners, it is well restrained and there is none of the cumbersome weight transfer generally associated with tall SUVs. It is a real achievement to have endowed the high-riding EX with all the responsiveness and entertainment levels of a big sports coupé.

Ride quality is firm, as is to be expected, but it represents a well resolved compromise between comfort and handling. Longer undulations in the road surface can cause some body float, and carrying speed over intrusions such as potholes and drain covers will result in loud thumping and intrusive jarring in the cabin. The Infiniti is also prone to tramlining, but in general it is composed, comfortable and exploitable.

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