No new ground is broken here in class terms, though if you’re trading up from an old Kia Sorento you would be forgiven for thinking so.

 

Nic Cackett

Nic Cackett

Road tester
Ride is comfortable enough but can still be caught out on UK roads

By the more exacting standards prevalent in the marketplace today, the Sorento is a competent handler which, while lacking any incentive for drivers to sniff out a decent road, will at least not frustrate them should they happen to chance upon one. It actually points rather well for such a large car, thanks to a precise and sensibly geared steering rack, though there is too much body roll, not enough body control and too little grip to offer more than token entertainment.

 

Superficially, the Sorento actually rides quite well and will let you glide along rather comfortably on smooth surfaces. But you don’t need a country as punctuated by potholes as the UK to spot the fact that, when actually given some work to do, the suspension fails to answer the more searching questions.

 

It may have a modern-sounding multi-link arrangement at the back, but this is not the first time we will have observed that the raw material is not enough on its own. It has to be expertly tuned and attached to a car of great torsional strength, and somewhere in this process the Sorento has fallen a little short of what you might expect.

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This is unlikely to be a deal-breaker for anyone considering the Sorento, but opt for the smallest wheels available on your chosen spec to get the best ride quality.

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