MG’s last new introduction, the 3 supermini of 2013, signalled progress and ambition from its maker, earning a three-and-a-half-star recommendation from us.

But while the GS offers similarly distinguishing performance, practicality and value, it feels like one step forward followed by two back.

Matt Saunders Autocar

Matt Saunders

Road test editor
Poor ride and patchy quality erode appeal of practical bargain crossover

It shows that continued growth isn’t a given for its maker and that if MG is in too great a hurry to expand, the battle to win new customers could rumble on for decades.

The potentially lucrative crossover segment is now populated by increasingly rounded and accomplished cars, and few buyers will be won over solely by aggressive pricing, a gutsy motor and a liberal helping of standard kit.

To be competitive, the GS would need a better ride, a better-finished cabin, a more economical engine, better systems sophistication and a greater breadth of ability.

If it were even eight or nine-tenths as capable as a Nissan Qashqai or Ford Kuga and as affordable as it is, it might make more of an impression.

But it’s plainly not that good. It means that it doesn’t make our top five with the GS falling behind the Suzuki Vitara, Honda HR-V, Mazda CX-3, Renault Captur and the king of the pile – the Skoda Yeti.

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