Performance sub-brand likely to use a tuned version of EQ range's hybrid system
James Attwood, digital editor
14 March 2019

Mercedes-AMG is likely to develop a plug-in hybrid version of every model in its line-up in the future, featuring a performance-tuned version of Mercedes-Benz’s EQ Power system. 

The move is part of a major push of plug-in hybrid (PHEV) technology being undertaken by Mercedes as a key element of its £9 billion electrification programme to dramatically reduce fleet CO2 emissions. As previously reported by Autocar, the first Mercedes-AMG PHEVs are expected in 2020. 

Mercedes-AMG currently offers a number of mild-hybrid models, including the CLS 53 and E53. These feature the firm’s EQ Boost-branded 48V starter/generator, which can deliver an additional 22bhp and 184lb ft of torque. However, the need to meet increasingly tight EU fleet emissions targets means that these are likely to be an intermediary step. 

Mercedes' head of external affairs for emissions, Frank Overmeyer, expressed his personal view that: "All the AMG vehicles will be available in the future with plug-in hybrids as an option. Mild hybrid is not the strategy of AMG, because the emissions savings are too small.” Overmeyer is not involved in the management or development of AMG models.

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Mercedes-Benz currently offers PHEV variants of the C-Class, E-Class and S-Class under the EQ Power badge, with GLC and GLE versions coming soon. The firm will launch 20 PHEV variants by the end of 2020, with an A-Class using a new plug-in powertrain developed specifically for compact cars due imminently. 

The models all feature the firm’s third-generation PHEV system. This uses an electric motor that produces 121bhp and 325lb ft and offers around 31 miles of electric-only range. Mercedes is working to extend that range with the next S-Class, due in 2020, which is expected to use a system that offers 62 miles of zero-emission power. 

Future Mercedes PHEV performance models, including those in the Mercedes-AMG line-up, are likely to use a version of that system but branded EQ Power+ (matching the team’s Formula 1 car) and tuned for extra performance at the expense of some range. 

“The battery itself and the application, including the electric motor, will be the same, and you can have a significant boost [in performance] that will reduce the range, but the experience will be better,” said Overmeyer. “Same battery, same drivetrain, different application. In an SUV, it might offer 100km [62 miles]. It might only be 60km or 70km [37-43 miles] in an AMG.” 

Although the need to reduce average fleet emissions is pushing manufacturers towards electric and other highly efficient tech, Overmeyer said high-performance AMG models will remain a key part of the Mercedes line-up. 

“They are the technical icons of our brand,” he said. “We should also never forget that the new world, these electric vehicles, need to be funded, and it’s being funded by our existing high-profit vehicles.”

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Comments
7

14 March 2019

"Mild hybrid is not the strategy of AMG, because the emissions savings are too small.” I've always sat on the fence regarding the monetary value of some Hybrids now big wigs seem to coming out and saying the same.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

14 March 2019
Too many people who have hybrids have told me they drive around with the battery flat all the time. It is too much hassle to plug it in somewhere every day.

So they are just lumping around the extra weight without any benefit - increasing emissions and reducing economy.

It begs the question has anyone, ever, got the economy and emissions results claimed by manufacturers? Or is it all pointless delusions and lies?

14 March 2019

Totally agree with you eseaton. My C350e has done just shy of 50k and the claimed 130+ MPG is laughable. It’s more like 40 MPG. I try to charge it 4 times a week (at work) and like a lot of people, don’t have the facility to charge it at home. In fact I’m not planning to make this change as it’s not in my interests since I pay tax on fuel as a benefit in kind. The whole system is a joke but I’m happy to take advantage while it lasts! 

14 March 2019
eseaton wrote:

Too many people who have hybrids have told me they drive around with the battery flat all the time. It is too much hassle to plug it in somewhere every day. So they are just lumping around the extra weight without any benefit - increasing emissions and reducing economy. It begs the question has anyone, ever, got the economy and emissions results claimed by manufacturers? Or is it all pointless delusions and lies?

The EU have decided only to measure the emissions from on board fuel. Therefore the point of the plug in hybrid to to get around the EU rules. Without plug in hybrids no car manufacturer will be able to meet future CO fleet averages, and continue to make desirable cars. 

Its sad, but bureaucrats come up with rules, and engineers find a way around them, but it will add cost and weight that we dont want. But thats why we will have plug in AMGs

14 March 2019
eseaton wrote:

Too many people who have hybrids have told me they drive around with the battery flat all the time. It is too much hassle to plug it in somewhere every day. So they are just lumping around the extra weight without any benefit - increasing emissions and reducing economy. It begs the question has anyone, ever, got the economy and emissions results claimed by manufacturers? Or is it all pointless delusions and lies?

We use a Outlander PHEV and it rarely runs the ICE, mostly only on the weekends. It is charged a couple of times a day however

So by our calculations it doesn't actually meet the published MPG but it isn't that unrealistic.

Ofcourse like everything it has to be used as is supposed too be used.

14 March 2019
Ubberfrancis44 wrote:

eseaton wrote:

Too many people who have hybrids have told me they drive around with the battery flat all the time. It is too much hassle to plug it in somewhere every day. So they are just lumping around the extra weight without any benefit - increasing emissions and reducing economy. It begs the question has anyone, ever, got the economy and emissions results claimed by manufacturers? Or is it all pointless delusions and lies?

We use a Outlander PHEV and it rarely runs the ICE, mostly only on the weekends. It is charged a couple of times a day however

So by our calculations it doesn't actually meet the published MPG but it isn't that unrealistic.

Ofcourse like everything it has to be used as is supposed too be used.

Did you buy it before the grant of either £2,500 or £1,750 was removed? Only these costs and the initial extra PHEV equipment cost need to be factored in.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

14 March 2019
eseaton wrote:

Too many people who have hybrids have told me they drive around with the battery flat all the time. It is too much hassle to plug it in somewhere every day. So they are just lumping around the extra weight without any benefit - increasing emissions and reducing economy. It begs the question has anyone, ever, got the economy and emissions results claimed by manufacturers? Or is it all pointless delusions and lies?

i have to agree, ive heard the same story, plus the fuel tan generally does only 190 miles so basically a lose lose situation


Whatever happens, don't get an electric.

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