TT line-up rumoured to be facing the chop as Audi concentrates engineering efforts and budgets on SUVs and EVs
6 February 2019

Audi has revealed updated versions of its range-topping small coupé and cabriolet, the 2019 TT RS and TT RS Roadster.

The revised model, which brings the BMW M2 rival in line with the rest of the range, comes as doubts surface about the future of the two-door. Rumours are circulating that the German car maker is considering axing the entire line-up as we know it, due to rapidly declining sales in key global markets.

facelifted versions of its standard TT and TT Roadster into UK showrooms in April, the 2019 model year TT RS and TT RS Roadster receive a series of small updates conceived to tide them over until a model change originally planned to take place in 2022.

However, recent word from insiders at Audi’s Ingolstadt-based headquarters in Germany suggests new chairman Bram Schot has already devised a plan to replace the TT with a new liftback model. It is expected to form part of the fourth-generation A3 line-up as a rival to the likes of the Mercedes-Benz CLA and upcoming BMW 2 Series Gran Coupé.

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If true, the move would mirror that of Mercedes-Benz, which has decided not to replace the SLC once the current model goes out of production.

Introduced in 1998, the TT has been a mainstay of the Audi line-up for more than 20 years. But with buyer preferences having swung firmly in the direction of its SUV models and Audi directing €14 billion (£12.3 billion) into electric car development over the next five years, serious doubts hang over its future. An earlier plan to turn the TT into a sub-brand supporting up to four models, including a sedan and SUV, was ultimately quashed by Audi board members.

Changes to the facelifted TT RS and TT RS Roadster are subtle. They include a lightly reworked front bumper and a modified wing element at the rear. Inside, there are new colour accents and an upgraded communication system.

The TT RS and TT RS Roadster continue to be powered by the same turbocharged 2.5-litre five-cylinder petrol engine as pre-facelifted models. It delivers 395bhp at 5850rpm and 354lb ft of torque between 1950 and 5850rpm.

The heady reserves are channelled to all four wheels via a standard seven-speed dual clutch S-Tronic gearbox and an electro-hydraulic multi-plate clutch four-wheel drive system.

The performance claims remain the same; the 1450kg TT RS boasts a claimed 0-62mph time of 3.7sec and the 1540kg TT RS Roadster a claimed 3.9sec. The top speed of both models is nominally limited to 155mph but can be raised to 174mph as part of a long list of options that brings upgraded 20-inch wheels and tyres.

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Comments
34

6 February 2019

 kind of not what it’s about?, more like how quick it is?, how it steers....

Peter Cavellini.

6 February 2019
Peter Cavellini wrote:

 kind of not what it’s about?, more like how quick it is?, how it steers....

Top speed, need to check before .....Coffee please!

Peter Cavellini.

6 February 2019
As an owner of a current gen TT, I can say this:

There's no way in hell I'll be purchasing the 'lift back' model. I wanted a sporty little car not another SUV. Not every person in every demographic wants a jacked up POS boat.

When I trade in this car I can say for sure - I won't be buying an audi

6 February 2019
flukey wrote:

As an owner of a current gen TT, I can say this: There's no way in hell I'll be purchasing the 'lift back' model. I wanted a sporty little car not another SUV. Not every person in every demographic wants a jacked up POS boat. When I trade in this car I can say for sure - I won't be buying an audi

Amen!

This SUV craze is getting out of hand.

6 February 2019
flukey wrote:

As an owner of a current gen TT, I can say this:

There's no way in hell I'll be purchasing the 'lift back' model. I wanted a sporty little car not another SUV.

But it won't be an SUV. I reckon it'll be like a smaller version of the A5 Sportback...

6 February 2019
flukey wrote:

Not every person in every demographic wants a jacked up POS boat.

Keep reading similar thoughts over and over again. And whilst I agree with you, the truth is it's uneconomical for a large manufacturer to build a vehicle for a niche market. The fact is more and more people are buying SUVs.

The manufacturer is telling you sales for the TT are declining, so you either have to accept paying a huge increase in price or as you say, you're next car won't be an Audi.

So what will you buy instead? And please remember that if Audi and Merc are pulling out of the market, competition decreases therefore the price of rivals increase. It's simply market forces at work.

6 February 2019
It's a good point you've put down made time and time again - if we want sports cars we need to put our money where our mouth is and buy them....

Except I did! I bought a brand new TT, a 2 door coupe, not a 4 door SUV. A manual, not an automatic. I think if anyone gets to moan I probably do haha!

I'm looking into f types or perhaps a lotus and a second casual car. I really want something around £60k, no turbos or 4 cylinders, manual gearbox. There was a time when this wasn't asking much!

6 February 2019
flukey wrote:

As an owner of a current gen TT, I can say this: There's no way in hell I'll be purchasing the 'lift back' model. I wanted a sporty little car not another SUV. Not every person in every demographic wants a jacked up POS boat. When I trade in this car I can say for sure - I won't be buying an audi

Put on your big boy pants and buy a used 911. Offset higher running costs (if any depending on model) against depreciation. Higher smiles per mile and you’ll look less of a wally. 

6 February 2019
Sorry I'm just not a big fan of porsches. I'm sure 911's are nice to drive but I think they're so boring to look at. On top of that I'm not a big fan of the brand image, same deal with BMW.

I'll be replacing the TT in 3 months for something about £60k, manual and no turbos (superchargers are OK). Shortlist is f type, Lotus, used R8. Its hard to find anything else in that category!

6 February 2019

Great car with alot of history in a short time so to speak. Also, has a bit of cult following.

Sold 17,000 in the Europe in 2017 which was more than 5 times the Cayman so I'm not sure why they can't make a business case for it especially as the platform and engine is based on other VAG massed produced models.

For around £30k you get a classic that's fast, realible, practical and will hold it's value

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

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