Hottest Mini returns for 2019 with enhanced standard equipment and reduced emissions
Felix Page Autocar writer
18 December 2018

Mini has revealed new John Cooper Works variants of the latest, facelifted three-door hatchback and convertible.

The most powerful versions in the Mini range have been equipped with new exhaust filtration technology to conform to Euro 6d-TEMP requirements and get through WLTP emissions regulations

The alterations to the 2.0-litre, twin-turbocharged four-cylinder engine haven’t affected the car’s performance.The JCW produces 231bhp and is capable of 0-62mph in 6.3sec in hatchback guise, 0.3sec quicker than the convertible. 

Fitted with the standard six-speed manual gearbox, the hatchback produces 158-157g/km of CO2, while the convertible is rated at 162-161g/km, depending on spec. The optional eight-speed automatic gearbox brings emission levels down to 142-140g/km and 148-145g/km respectively.

Mini claims the new particulate filter has been integrated into the exhaust system in such a way that allows for “a characteristic sound inside and outside the vehicle.” 

Our Verdict

Mini John Cooper Works
Mini's John Cooper Works auto is less highly strung than before but quicker than ever

Faster and more rounded than any ‘Works’ Mini before it. Still a committed prospect – to buy and to use – but rewarding to drive

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Standard equipment offerings for the UK market have been enhanced, with a choice of 17in alloy wheels, black exterior and interior trim, and leather bucket seats now available at no extra cost on both body styles. 

Also fitted as standard to the performance model is a sports suspension and braking system, while a John Cooper Works bodykit visually differentiates it from other models in Mini’s line-up. As with all other Mini models, LED front and rear lights, automatic headlights and rain sensors are standard fitment. 

The new John Cooper Works models are available to order from 18 January 2019, with production beginning in March for deliveries later that month. Prices for manual variants start from £25,935 for the hatchback and £29,235 for the convertible, rising to £27,325 and £30,625 respectively for the eight-speed automatic.

Read more

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Mini confirms new John Cooper Works GP will arrive in 2020​

Mini’s future under scrutiny​

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Comments
11

18 December 2018
I bet they ruined the sound, the last ones sounded epic.

19 December 2018
Ubberfrancis44 wrote:

I bet they ruined the sound, the last ones sounded epic.

My wife has the new 3 door Cooper S and the sound they make now compaired to her 5 door S is another world, not sure what they have done but chalk and cheese now

 

 

19 December 2018

 A nip here, a tuck there, a few new shiny bits, a tweak under the Bonnet too no doubt, but, it’s a Mini(?), so it’ll sell no problem.

Peter Cavellini.

19 December 2018

Will never be as good as the R53 was.

It may be more powerful but the Gen1 Cooper S is a much better car.

I may be biased though :p

19 December 2018

Here's the thing about the Mini. We've owned the current one and the previous one and if we could still get away with having a small car in our family we would buy another one in a heartbeat.

To the point where we wouldn't even both looking at any other small car, we'd just buy one no other small car gets close for us. Many people buy the Fiesta, it's not actually that much cheaper than a MINI and frankly I don't get why you'd trade the build quality and interior comfort of a MINI for one. Interestingly I note MINI is creaping up the top 10 list of cars sold in the UK every year. So I wonder if gradually others are cottoning on.

19 December 2018

I do agree with T Stag: we have one, too....and the overall quality strikes you each time you drive it. But, could they please ditch those very ugly sub-bumper intakes front & back on the Cooper S hatch ?  We actually went for the Cooper (instead of the S) because the styling on the S was so 'Yesterday's Halfords'.  Surely BMW can do better than that ?  Here's hoping the Mark IV will address that (eventually) - supposing, of course, that BMW will still be in Oxford after Mrs May's wrecked the economy :-)

BertoniBertone

19 December 2018
TStag wrote:

Here's the thing about the Mini. We've owned the current one and the previous one and if we could still get away with having a small car in our family we would buy another one in a heartbeat.

To the point where we wouldn't even both looking at any other small car, we'd just buy one no other small car gets close for us. Many people buy the Fiesta, it's not actually that much cheaper than a MINI and frankly I don't get why you'd trade the build quality and interior comfort of a MINI for one. Interestingly I note MINI is creaping up the top 10 list of cars sold in the UK every year. So I wonder if gradually others are cottoning on.

 

Whilst I havent driven a new one, the ones I have driven are a fair bit smaller than a fiesta. We have had several superminis as our family car but the mini was too small for us when we looked, admittedly at used ones, the first and second generation models, so that maybe why others buy the fiesta etc? We could run one now as we need less space.

19 December 2018

I've had 3 MINIs over the last 14 years, one first generation and two second generation, and I've had a couple of the latest models as courtesy vehicles. I want a smaller vehicle, but I struggle to fit my long-legged, big footed frame into any comparable model: I can really get comfortable behind the wheel in a MINI so its a major plus. I'm also one of the few people left in the world (allegedly) who wants a small 3-door hatchback, which, at the moment,the company still makes.

19 December 2018
Dutch the Union Jack tail lights, and I'll take it. Doesn't matter whether it it's not too roomy at the back by the way.

20 December 2018

I quite like the union flag tail lights.

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