The Q2 range will in time be propped up by a 1.0 TFSI triple, starting at £20,230 and making an entry-level SE around £6k less than the cheapest Q3.

Naturally, that notable price difference is crucial to the newcomer’s appeal as a more modestly priced way into a four-ringed crossover.

Nic Cackett

Nic Cackett

Road tester
Q2 isn’t quite expected to match the Seat Ateca’s values but is likely to be a solid prospect nonetheless

And while you can have the likes of a Mini Countryman or Seat Ateca for less, Audi will be hoping to plunder some would-be buyers of both courtesy of its nominally superior desirability.

But as you might expect from the brand, the Q2 is not modestly priced across the board nor generously equipped.

Our Sport trim car with a smattering of options was £28,655, which isn’t far from a range-topping Ateca or even the larger Volkswagen Tiguan with the same engine.

Predictably, the 1.4 TFSI, even with its admirable economy and 124g/km CO2 figure, isn’t the running cost champion (unless you’re preoccupied by benefit-in-kind, in which case you should opt for the 1.0 TFSI).

That honour falls to the 1.6 TDI (114g/km, 64.2mpg combined), which, in Sport trim and with 17in alloys, sat-nav and cruise control, costs £24,030 – or £150 more than the equivalent Ateca, despite the Audi’s deficiency in size, equipment and contract hire cost.

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If it was our money, we would shy away from the sub-£30,000 S line spec models and go for the less ritzy Sport model. However, if you want to opt for a Q2 that stands out from the crowd then the Edition #1 is for you.

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