From £96,4958

Like the V8 Vantage coupé, the roadster is constructed on Aston Martin’s VH (vertical-horizontal) platform, first seen on the Vanquish.

Similar in principle to the basis of the Lotus Elise, the VH platform uses aluminium extrusions and castings, bonded and riveted together. This is both light (the chassis weighs just 197kg) and particularly well suited to convertible cars, with the majority of the car’s rigidity coming from the chassis rather than exterior body panels.

Matt Burt

Matt Burt

Executive Editor, Autocar
The fabric roof means it can stow without impacting the cars rear-end styling

That said, for the roadster Aston has included additional strengthening, but the extent is minimal and it adds just 14kg to the chassis weight. 

Other than the new fabric roof, which raises and lowers at the touch of a button in 22 seconds, and the addition of a pair of elegant buttresses to the rear deck, the roadster’s design and construction mirrors that of the coupé with aluminium, steel and composite body panels.

The suspension architecture is also identical: aluminium double wishbones, coils springs and anti-roll bars front and rear. However, for the roadster Aston has tweaked the V8 Vantage set-up, increasing spring stiffness and raising the ride height – changes that will find their way into the coupé. The V12 S gets an adaptive suspension set-up with rear getting dual-rate coil springs.

Find an Autocar car review

Explore the Aston Martin range

Driven this week

A conventional six-speed manual is standard, but the roadster can be specifed with Sportshift, an automated manual with an electro-hydraulic clutch and steering wheel paddles, while the more powerful V12 S Roadster is only available with Aston Martin's Sportshift III 'box.

Save money on your car insurance

Compare quotesCompare insurance quotes

Find an Autocar car review

Explore the Aston Martin range

Driven this week