The Crossland X’s platform has come from PSA, and although that means there are elements to the car’s proportions that aren’t traditionally Vauxhall-like, the car has enough of Vauxhall’s core design elements to prevent you from mistaking it as a car from somebody else.

Cues from other Vauxhalls have been integrated to make sure that’s the case. The Adam-esque treatment of the roof around the rear three-quarters gives buyers the opportunity to have the roof a different colour from the body.

Doug Revolta Autocar

Doug Revolta

Editorial assistant
It’s nice to have a manual handbrake, but the flimsy one in the Crossland X feels like you could yank it off. The quality of materials in the cabin is mixed — and the handbrake is a low point

The bodysides, which otherwise might have been too slab-sided for Vauxhall’s relatively sophisticated design style, have been made to look a bit more racy by Vauxhall’s sculpting, which employs a style we first saw on the previous-generation Insignia, where they added some dynamism and made it look more rear-drive.

And the relatively bluff front end has received a Vauxhall grille and headlights to reasonable effect. But Vauxhall thinks the Mokka X is the more premium proposition and, in appearance, we’d agree.

The engineering is as straight as you’d expect at this size and class. The Crossland X is only 4.2m long, barely longer than some superminis, and it gets a steel monocoque basis. It tipped our scales at 1287kg.

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At the front, it’s suspended by MacPherson struts, with a torsion beam at the rear. Petrol engines are three-cylinder 1.2-litre turbo units, badged Ecotec but fundamentally the same as PSA’s units. They can be had in 80bhp, 108bhp and 128bhp guises, mated to five-speed (80bhp) or six-speed manual gearboxes, with an automatic optional.

Then there are two diesel engines, both 1.6s, which offer either 98bhp or 118bhp.

The rest is mostly as you’d expect. There’s stop/start and electric power steering but, to Vauxhall’s credit, more active safety and security features – albeit some of them options – than you’ll find on many of the Crossland X’s rivals.

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